Read the latest transcripts for the WP Plugins Podcast and training Videos.

It's Episode 284 and we've got plugins for Dynamic Charts, Text to Speech, Table Of Contents, Responsive Tables and a new method to design custom products on the fly. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 284

It's Episode 284 and we've got plugins for Dynamic Charts, Text to Speech, Table Of Contents, Responsive Tables and a new method to design custom products on the fly. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #284


It’s Episode 284 and we’ve got plugins for Dynamic Charts, Text to Speech, Table Of Contents, Responsive Tables and a new method to design custom products on the fly. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #284

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got here today is called HiCharts. It was sent into us by Mustapha and it’s a free plugin. What it does is it allows you to create some really great charts, all done locally on your website. It uses Java, JQuery, and other ways to create the charts. It creates multiple charts. It comes with built-in templates to allow you to create pie charts, scatter charts, bar charts, backwards, forwards, just for the bars – everything you need in it. It makes it a breeze setting up the charts on here.

They’re very pretty; they look very nice, and if you’ve got a chunk of CSV data that you want to turn into a chart, you just import that CSV data and it builds the chart out for you automatically. It’s a really great plugin. The developers have a couple of other great plugins that allow you to create more intensive charts and maps that are their premium versions. Also, we’re going to be doing an interview with these guys coming up in about a week, so stay tuned for that. But other than that, it’s a really great plugin. I found it lots of fun and very useful for creating charts and I had to give it a nice 5-Dragon rating, so check it out.

Marcus:           Cool. That’s really nice. I will check that out. The first plugin that I’ve got today is something that’s pretty interesting, actually. We all have seen some of those things that you can go design your own T-shirt or some of those other things where they just kind of have a blank T-shirt or business card maybe, and you can design your own based on some of the fonts and the clipart that they use. This allows you to do that exact thing.

You can place like a blank T-shirt down and give a couple different designs that people can chose from and then they can drag-n-drop things, they can put stuff on the back, if they wanted to design their own jersey or their own business card, or anything like that – any kind of custom personalization.

This plugin is called Product Designer and it works via shortcode anywhere in the page. You can add any kind of unlimited clipart, custom post types, anything like that, and it works very, very well, so check it out. I’ve got a link in the show notes to it and to a demo of this plugin. It’s called Product Designer and I gave it a 4 out of 5.

John:                That sounds kind of cool.

Marcus:           Yeah, I’ve never seen anything like it for WordPress.

John:                No kidding. That’s nice.

Marcus:           Mm-hmm.

John:                So that works with WooCommerce. That’s a great way to sell your custom products like coffee cups, T-shirts, and other miscellaneous things.

Marcus:           Absolutely, absolutely – anything.

John:                Something I’ve been looking for for WooCommerce for quite some time.

Marcus:           Yep, anything like that. It’s pretty cool for a product designer.

John:                All right, the next plugin I have here is called Table of Contents Plus and this is a plugin that helps you build a table of contents for your site and it does this by creating a menu base of your posts and pages hierarchy. Now, this would be a great plugin if you’ve got your posts and pages categorized or your posts categorized or your categories in a hierarchy, being parent and subcategories, child categories, and everything through it. Your page is set up in a hierarchy of parent and child categories.

What it does is it takes those and then it builds an automatic menu. You can place the menu anywhere on your site using a shortcode. You place it in a post, a page, a widget, or a sidebar, and it builds it out automatically. It’s a great way if you’ve got an extensive website with lots of subcategories and other things that you need to be able to easily display for people to find their way around, this is a great plugin for you. It’s relatively easy to set up, it’s a pretty decent plugin, and I liked the functionality of it. It would also build out a great sitemap for your users, too, if you wanted to use it as a sitemap builder – a user-friendly sitemap builder, so you can stick it all on one page and have an instant sitemap. So check it out. It’s called Table of Contents Plus, and I gave it a 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Very good. All right, the next plugin that I’ve got is called Text To Speech Widget, and it allows you to convert any text into speech in a selected language and voice. It supports 63 different voices and different languages and as the plugin implies, it converts text into speech. It’s pretty easy to install, very flexible in how you can use it, and it requires almost no configuration. So you can drag-n-drop this widget into the widget areas and it works great in terms of reading out your blog posts or anything like that.

It’s based on HTML5, so it’s not Flash-required or anything like that. It’s works right out of the box with standard WordPress and there are no limitations on this plugin. It’s a free plugin and you can convert unlimited words to speech, and I gave it a 4 out 5. And John, I’m waiting for the day where it can actually use my voice and then I’ll never have to show up to record another podcast again. I’ll just blog and record the text-to-speech output. But until that day, I’m happy to podcast.

John:                So, real briefly, I was just looking at it. So you actually have to write the text into a block and have it play it back for you?

Marcus:           Yes. Mm-hmm.

John:                Okay, so it doesn’t just automatically – what they’d have to do is copy and paste the text from your page and then hit play and play it out?

Marcus:           That’s right.

John:                Ah, okay.

Marcus:           That’s right.

John:                It’s still kind of useful. I was thinking that if they hit play, it would start reading on your page.

Marcus:           Well, there are some options for that. You can actually do that type of thing but it requires a little bit of setup beforehand.

John:                Oh, okay. That could be quite useful, especially for those that are having troubles making out what you’ve written or don’t have time to read it and just want to hear it.

Marcus:           Yeah, and if you’re sight impaired, then you can definitely use this to hear what’s going on.

John:                Okay. All right, and the final plugin I’ve got here is called JTRT Responsive Tables. This one here is if you do use tables of data on your website and you want to have those tables responsive, you can use this plugin to build out your tables. You build them out in the backend of your site and it uses custom post types for building out the tables.

Not a bad plugin. It allows you to import data via CSV file, it’s got lots of options on how to configure your tables, and you can use it for the creation of unique product tables that will automatically adjust in size as people hit their mobile devices on it. All in all, not too bad of a plugin. Check it out: it’s called JTRT Responsive Tables and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Very cool. All right, one last one here. It is a WooCommerce plugin and it’s called Featured Products First. What it allows you to do is create and flag specific products in your list that are featured products and no matter what iteration, sort setting, filter, or things like that that you list, it will always put the featured products first. It’s especially handy if you have maybe a couple of main products and then some side products, this will make sure that those main products always get filtered first to the top of the list. It’s called Featured Products First for WooCommerce and I have it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. That would be a great way to take your products that are on sale and put them at the top of the page.

Marcus:           Yeah, and not just your on-sale products. But if you have specific products that always are going to be sold, like a membership plan or something like that, let’s just say will use the Membership Coach site for example. I have annual or monthly plans, but then I also have things like e-books and little starter courses and things like that that I sell for just a little bit cheaper.

John:                Yeah.

Marcus:           But I don’t want people to just buy those; I want them to buy the membership. So I’ll put the membership plans as featured products and then I know that no matter what, they’ll always end up on top.

John:                Very nice. Okay, well in this episode I covered up HiCharts, which I gave a 5 to; Table of Contents Plus, which I gave a 3 to; and then the JTRT Responsive Tables, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I talked about Product Designer, which I gave a 4 out of 5; Text To Speech Widget, 4 out of 5; and Featured Products First for WooCommerce also gets a 4 out of 5.

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 283 and we've got plugins for Automated Gallery Compositions, Better Search, Logo Carousels, Shortcodes Anywhere and a cool new plugin for taking notes in the edit screen. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 283

It's Episode 283 and we've got plugins for Automated Gallery Compositions, Better Search, Logo Carousels, Shortcodes Anywhere and a cool new plugin for taking notes in the edit screen. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #283


It’s Episode 283 and we’ve got plugins for Automated Gallery Compositions, Better Search, Logo Carousels, Shortcodes Anywhere and a cool new plugin for taking notes in the edit screen. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #283

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got here today is called Shortcodes Anywhere or Everywhere. Now, I know I might have covered this in the past or Marcus has, but it’s time to bring some plugins back forth from time to time. Now, sooner or later you’ll be in the need to display a shortcode somewhere on your website aside from just in a post or a page. You might need it in a widget, in a title, in a custom area – who knows. Well, that’s what this plugin does for you. It saves you the headache and hassle of having to add functions to your functions file and once you install it and turn it on, you just determine what areas you want to be able to use short codes, turn them on, and away you go. It just allows you to add a shortcode anywhere.

Now, something I discovered by accident by playing with it today was be aware of the areas you turn on, because sometimes it’ll override stuff that’s in your theme. I had turned on the area for titles to see what it would do and it turned out it wiped out all of my images for the title of my posts, so something in my theme conflicted with it. So anyway, be aware of those kinds of issues; other than that, it’s a really great plugin. It saves you lots of time: Shortcodes Anywhere or Everywhere, and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Very good. Yeah, I use that all the time in a lot of different themes. The first plugin I’ve got today is called STM Gallery 0.9, which means it’s still in production. It is a pretty neat little tool, John. What it allows you to do is create original compositions based on images that are already in your media library, and it gives you the option to change the borders, the margins, the shadow of the images. You can make it kind of like a bunch of Polaroids laying down if you want to, that are all kind of hooked together.

And if you want different images rotated or anything like that, you can do that as well. You can create as many compositions as you want with all the parameters that you decide, and you just end up showing them through a shortcode. Now, that’s where this think kind of went off the tracks for me, because I want to be able to take that and use that as a featured image. However, it doesn’t let you.

John:                Oh, bummer!

Marcus:           So —

John:                I was so excited there for a second.

Marcus:           — so it nixes that part of it.

John:                Yeah?

Marcus:           I mean, it’s great for just inserting it within your posts and having a nice little gallery, but maybe I want to have a featured image of it. It just didn’t do it, so I rated it a 3 out of 5.

John:                All righty. Well, that’s okay. I was getting excited there a minute until you said that.

Marcus:           I know. Me, too. Me, too.

John:                Okay, the next plugin I’ve got here is called Better Internal Link Search. Now, as I mentioned, it’s good to bring plugins back from our distant past and this is a plugin that I reviewed quite some time ago, back in Episode 121 of April, 2013, and I was wondering how it was doing. I may bring some more plugins back from the distant past to see how they’re doing and how they’ve fared, because lots of plugins have survived; others have disappeared entirely.

This one here though, it looks like they have kept it up to date. The functionality is still great. What it does for you once it’s installed and activated, it does a faster job of allowing you to insert links to your content within your site. With just a few keystrokes, it’s much faster than a default one. This is when you’re in your post and you click the Add a Link button and you’re going to go type up some information. But it also allows you to go search for content outside your site: areas like Wikipedia, GitHub, iTunes, Spotify, Codex, and probably a couple others. It allows you to bring those links in very quickly and easily.

It’s pretty well performing, a decent plugin still. Back then, I gave it a 4 and I’m still going to give it a 4-Dragon rating. Check it out: Better Internal Link Search.

Marcus:           Yeah, that’s definitely something that WordPress needs more of.

John:                Mm-hmm.

Marcus:           All right, the next one is something that all of us as designers or developers or things like that that have our own personal site (or even customer sites that you work on) sometimes use this. It’s called a logo carousel, and this plugin is called Unlimited Logo Carousel, and that is basically kind of a conveyor belt that shows different logos of your clients or the projects that you worked on, sponsors, affiliates, partners – anything like that.

This plugin is totally 100% responsive, which means all your logos show up across all devices perfectly. After clicking each logo, the user is directed to a manufacturer’s page or whatever page that you want to highlight the project. It lets you configure the colors, the speed, the amount of items to show, all kinds of other features, and I really liked this plugin a lot. It’s called Unlimited Logo Carousel, and it gets a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice! Does it only display them in a row or will it stack them?

Marcus:           It stacks, too.

John:                Oh, sweet.

Marcus:           So you get to determine how you want them and how many across and all that.

John:                Sweet, this might actually solve a problem I’m having.

Marcus:           Hm.

John:                Excellent. I’m going to have to play with it then and see. I appreciate that. I always love it when you bring something to the table that helps me solve a problem I’ve been fighting with.

Marcus:           Ah, it’s my job.

John:                Okay, the final plugin I’ve got is called Hide the Dragons. Now, how could I not bring a plugin that had ‘dragons’ in its title? Initially, I thought it was going to be one of those joke plugins because the description is like, “Turn it on, that’s all you do, and it hides all the dragons.” They don’t describe anything about what the plugin does. I thought it was going to be one of those plugins I’ve been caught out before and I thought it was really cool and it turned out to be an April Fool’s joke.

Now, I know it’s not April Fool’s but hey. Anyway, what this plugin does is I took a look at the code to see what it did and I also installed it on my test site. What they mean by dragons is it allows you to instantly clean up an admin area to prevent – say you build a site and your users or your people you turn it over to, you don’t want them to access things such as the editor, the dashboard nags, the plugin info links. It removes the tools menu and more.

What it does is it goes through and removes all the most irritating areas or confusing areas to the website that an average user or a beginner at WordPress really doesn’t want to mess with. Now, I did find a conflicted with plugins when I was testing it and when I tried to check out how it got rid of all of the widgets on the dashboard for the admin area, it turned out that I white-screened when I did that. So it does have a couple of issues with it, but looking through the code, it looks like it cleans up a lot of stuff in the WordPress dashboard area. But it does it with one smooth click and you have no controls over what it turns on and off.

It looks like it could be a cool plugin if it was expanded out with some options to turn things on and off and play with it. Other than that, it could be interesting, so at this moment in time, we give Hide the Dragons a paltry 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Hmm…it’s kind of like childproofing your dashboard, yeah.

John:                That’s pretty much it – childproofing your house there.

Marcus:           All right, I’ve got one that’s actually pretty cool. It is called Take Note, and with this WordPress plugin, it does one simple, lazy type of thing and it just shows right under your normal content post editor, it actually shows an area where you can just take notes. The visitors never see the notes, they never go live, there’s no way to make the notes live. It’s simply just another text area that you can use to keep notes on your posts.

John:                Oh, sweet.

Marcus:           And I rated it a 5 out of 5.

John:                Nice – so with it, is there a way to read the notes in bulk, or do you have to go back to each individual one?

Marcus:           No, it’s just a scratch pad for each post.

John:                Just a scratch pad? Oh, okay. Yeah, it could be very useful in many different ways if you want to keep a note or an idea, like, “Oh, I need this email address. I need to do this.” You can read your notes and go back and say, “Hey, did I do that?”

Marcus:           Right.

John:                Excellent.

Marcus:           Exactly! Okay.

John:                All right, well in this episode, I covered up Shortcodes Anywhere or Everywhere, and I gave it a 4; I covered Better Internal Link Search, which I gave a 4; and then Hide the Dragons, which I gave a 3.

Marcus:           And I covered STM Gallery 0.9, which I gave a 3; Unlimited Logo Carousel, which gets a 4 out of 5; and Take Note, which gets a 5 out of 5.

 

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 282 and we've got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 282

It's Episode 282 and we've got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #282


It’s Episode 282 and we’ve got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z


Episode #282

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got this week here is WP Login Timeout Settings. What this plugin came about, I was in need of adding an automatic logout system on an intranet I’ve been working on so that when someone gets on the website and they might login from their computer or maybe they login from a hotel computer or something.

It happens way too many times people walk away from the computer and they leave themselves logged in and they just forget. That can be a very dangerous thing, so what we needed was some way to ensure that if someone left themselves logged in, it automatically logged them out of the website. While WordPress has this in place, it usually takes a week or two for that login to expire. We needed it to happen within minutes of lack of activity on the website. So this one here I checked out first to see what it would do. While this plugin helps you set it up, it allows you to override the default auto logout time of the WordPress site. You can set a timeout for the remember me function, you can also set a shorter logout for the different roles you have.

It had a couple of limitations that just didn’t quite work with what I was doing, but it will work in some aspects for what you might need. You can set it up to have a redirect to a special logout page after the auto logout. All in all, not a bad plugin. It worked fairly well. I did however, because it just didn’t provide all the functionality that I thought it should have had, I gave it a 3-Dragon rating. Check it out: WP Login Timeout Settings.

Marcus:           All right. Well, the first one that I’ve got today is something that’s pretty cool. It’s called Custom Donations, and it allows you to accept a user-entered custom donation amount through PayPal, and this could even include a set-your-own recurring donation as well.

This plugin was actually created in response to PayPal changing some of the functionality of their donate buttons, and that just happened in October. It allows users access to features which PayPal made a lot harder to customize and access, so this one will handle it all right within WordPress. Check it out. It’s called Custom Donations, and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Sweet! That’ll be quite nice for those using custom donation buttons.

Marcus:           Mm-hmm. Yes.

John:                Okay, the next one I’ve got here is another auto-logout plugin. It’s called Idle User Logout and this plugin here turned out to be a bit better for handling logouts. What it does is it looks for inactivity on the webpage. Someone logs in, the mouse doesn’t move, the keyboard doesn’t click, and it looks for that activity on the page. After a set number of minutes that you decide and set, it auto logs them out.

Now, one of the great features here is you can have it pop up a reminder window, although there’s a limitation in this window, which I’ve contacted the developer and I’m working with him to do some customizations for it so there’s a pop-up window that people can click on to continue or ignore.

All in all, it was much more functional for setting up in this particular instance where we needed it so if someone walked away, after five minutes of inactivity, it automatically logged them out. That was one of the big things that we wanted to look for was that it noticed the activity. Other than that, it was a really great plugin and currently I’m giving it a rating of 4 Dragons, but after the added functionality I’m talking to the developer for, it may pop it up to a 5. But hey, check it out: Idle User Logouts.

Marcus:           Very cool. The next one I’ve got is a WooCommerce plugin. This one is titled URL Coupons for WooCommerce, and it does just that. So once you create a coupon or a promo code within WooCommerce, this actually gives you a unique store link for each coupon on your website. Let’s just say I had WPAZ for the coupon. I could say Membershipcoach.com/WPAZ would take you not only to the product that you need to go to, but it will automatically apply that WPAZ promo code.

John:                Oh, sweet!

Marcus:           So you can hide the coupon fields within the URL as well and it also applies the link to graphics or anything else like that that you can add with just one click in your newsletters, emails, whatever you happen to do. All you have to do is click that link and it goes to the site, adds the product, and applies the coupon. Really handy, very easy to use, and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Yeah, that’s a great plugin, especially when you’re using your email marketing or other promo pieces.

Marcus:           Right!

John:                People — save them a click; you help encourage them to buy.

Marcus:           Yeah, whatever you can do to make it faster and easier, and dealing with promo codes sometimes is a real pain because they deal with mobile use and sometime it capitalizes the first letter in the coupon.

John:                Oh, yeah.

Marcus:           Sometimes it’s all caps or case-sensitive, and this just alleviates all that stuff, so you know which product it is and which coupon you get, so check it out.

John:                Excellent. Okay, the final one I’ve got here today is called Post Table Pro. This is a premium plugin; it was sent into us by Katie from Barn2.co.uk, and I interviewed her last week, so go back into the website and check out Interview 8. It was a really great interview and at that time, I hadn’t checked out the plugin yet, but I’ve since had a chance to check out this plugin.

It’s a really great plugin and what it does for you is it allows you to put a table via shortcode into your website that will create a table based upon your posts, your custom post types, pages, and then it lists all those tables up. It puts an image, the title, the excerpt or content of the post, and then other information in there. Then you can sort that information by clicking at the top of the table, so you can sort it alphabetically by the tables or the title name or it’s also got a built-in search function that searches within that particular table for the information you’re looking for.

One of the things that I’m experimenting with right now and I’m finding it to not work too badly at all is we have a lot of podcasts – about 281 out there already – this will make 282, and that’s a lot of plugins that we’ve reviewed. We’re trying to find a way for people to look back in the shows to find the plugins. This is not doing too bad of a job of finding those plugins when you search for a plugin by name or type. The problem I ran into with it right now is it didn’t work so well in the MU environment. I managed to test it on my own website where the show is also duplicated at and it works very nicely. But as far as the MU environment goes, I’m going to have to talk to the developers and see if it’s the problem with the way I have the MU environment or if there’s a conflict in the plugin – most likely me and all the plugins I’m running on our website right now.

But other than that, this is a really great plugin. The functionality is great and it’s very speedy. They’ve also got a couple of other specialized plugins that create a table for WooCommerce, so you’ll want to go back and listen to the interview where we talk about those other plugins they have or just go check out this plugin and check out their other stuff. A great plugin – I gave it a 4-Dragon rating, and it’s called Post Table Pro.

Marcus:           Excellent. Well John, you know, back in the 80s when I had my very first computer, I was one of the very few people that actually got a printer when they first came out.

John:                Wow, you were rich!

Marcus:           Oh, right. And the nice thing about it is I was able to make a deal with the local pizza shop so that I could print out their menus and then we would just photocopy those and we did a nice exchange, so I would have pizza as I was growing up each week.

John:                Hey, that’s a bonus.

Marcus:           I got a free pizza. Well, you may get your chance to do the same thing with WordPress, everyone. This plugin is called PizzaTime, and if you’re interested in making websites for a pizza establishment, this is a pretty great plugin to do it. What it is is a virtual pizza builder for WooCommerce, so it has full WooCommerce integration, it has 25 premade pizza ingredients, you can add your own custom ingredients, you can modify the left and right sides of the pizza differently for different toppings. You can have regular portions, lite portions, extra portions, and there’s full photos and descriptions of the ingredients. You can also do a maximum ingredient limit on the pizza and the pizza image will adjust accordingly —

John:                Nice!

Marcus:           — as you put new stuff on there. It’s totally responsive and completely translation-ready as well. This is a very fun plugin, very cool. I wish I owned a pizza shop now. I rated it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Sweet! That’s pretty cool that it actually does that kind of like ordering from Dominos, where it decorates your pizza as you go.

Marcus:           That’s right.

John:                Hey, gotta love that, man. People love the interactivity.

Marcus:           Yeah, and it means that they don’t screw the pizza up, either.

John:                Yeah, absolutely. All right, well in this episode I covered up WP Login Timeout Settings, which I gave a 3 to; Idle User Logout, which I gave a 4 to; and then Post Table Pro, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I reviewed Custom Donations, which gets a 4 out of 5, URL Coupons gets a 4 out of 5, and we just talked about PizzaTime, which gets a 5 out of 5.

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 281

It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #281


It’s Episode 281 and we’ve got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #281

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got here this week is called Nav Menu Roles. Now what this one’s for is when you’ve got your nav menus, there’s oftentimes where you need to limit access to different items in the nav menu and there’s multiple ways to go about this. You can write code, you can have shorts, you can do all kinds of things, but I wanted a simple method. I got tired of all the headaches involved with it, so I thought well maybe somebody has created a plugin by now that makes that job easy. And sure enough, as they say, “There’s an app for that,” well there’s a plugin for that.

This one here is very simple to set up. You set it up, activate it, and then you get to go into your menus and you choose the menu items, hit the drop-down, and then you can choose to show or hide that menu item, depending upon their role, whether they be administrator, a member, a user, subscriber – whatever – choose their roles. You can hide menu items quick and easy and it works beautiful. This is one of those quick, simple, easy, lazy plugins that we just thoroughly enjoy, so I had to give this one a top 5-Dragon rating. Check it out: Nav Menu Roles.

Marcus:           All right, very nice. Okay, first one I’ve got here is called Show Featured Image Size in Admin TopBar. Come on, guys. Condense these names. This is way too [inaudible]. This is a really simple plugin. What it does is it displays the image size, the resolution, of whatever the featured image is on the admin bar up at the top. It’s really handy because then you don’t have to look up the default size of each featured image or anything like that every time you post. So it will change according to what post you’re looking at and show you what the resolution of that featured image is.

Now, it’s handy because sometimes it gets cut off or it’s skewed or sometimes there’s text that you might lay out that just ends up getting chopped in different sizes. This is a handy reference to let you know what you’re looking at when you’re developing a size to kind of get that featured image size exactly the same dimensions that you need it to be in order to work well. So I rated this one a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice! Excellent. Okay, the next one I’ve got here for you today is called DCG Display Plugin Data from WordPress.org. Now, this is a very nice plugin and this is one that I’ve been looking for for quite some time. We’ve had other options to be able to pull the plugin data from the WordPress Repository. You know, all of the information about star rating, the location, the URL for it, the author, and all those bits of information. That’s always been problematic, because I’ve had to use multiple shortcodes to pull it together. Well, no longer.

This plugin here uses one shortcode and you can put pieces into the shortcode to show more or less information. But if you use the default shortcode, it shows the short snippet of that plugin information from WordPress.org. You can use it in multiple areas and how I’m using it mainly for us, I’ll start to use it with our show notes, so all the free plugins will always show the latest information, instead of the short bits of information we’ve been showing for a very long time.

But the main reason I wanted this is in the store of the WordPress A to Z website is I wanted to be able to have an area where the plugins that we find fantastic, we can easily share with people, and they can go over to our store, locate them, and then download them at a later time. They’re going to be sorted by types and other things as it goes along, and this plugin just made that job so easy to do to be able to display that information. It’s one of those beautiful, lazy plugins that actually works the way it’s supposed to, and of course, this one gets another 5-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           All right, this next plugin is called WP-MQTT. Now what it does is it connects WordPress to the Internet of Things.

John:                Oh, wow.

Marcus:           Yes, this plugin will automatically send MQTT protocol messages when something happens on your website. MQTT is a machine-to-machine Internet of Things connectivity protocol. You know, I know that the Internet of Things is supposed to be so that your washer and dryer can talk to each other and – I don’t know, tell you when the clothes are done and your fridge is supposed to tell you when you’re out of milk and eggs and all that kind of stuff. I’m not quite sure what this could be used for, but I like the idea.

John:                Yeah.

Marcus:           I like the idea of maybe when I go to a certain page, the lights come on, or when a sale happens. Maybe I’ve got something that —

John:                Have a bell go off while you’re watching your favorite movie.

Marcus:           Yeah, or maybe it ices down a cold beer for me when I get a big sale.

John:                Hey, there you go.

Marcus:           Who knows? Who knows. You guys tell me what you would use something like this for and I’ll definitely take that suggestion in consideration. In the meantime, I gave this one a 4 out of 5.

John:                Sounds like it could be interesting to use and of course, the first thing that popped into my mind was a way to expand that giant botnet that attacked a few weeks ago.

Marcus:           Oh, great! [Laughter]

John:                Sorry, Internet of Things, man: wonderful and scary at the same time.

Marcus:           Yeah. You know, I don’t know. I don’t have anything – I don’t believe I have anything else that’s connected to the internet. I know my washing machine or my fridge is not. But who knows?

John:                I have my phone, my computers, and my TV and my DVD player.

Marcus:           Now, here’s another thing: I wonder if it goes the other way, which is the other things can connect to your WordPress site.

John:                That’s the whole problem.

Marcus:           And give you a nice dashboard.

John:                And that’s what is eventually occurring.

Marcus:           Yeah, so maybe I can use it to monitor all the cool things that are going on in my house?

John:                Monitor it or you’re at the airport and you go, “God, did I turn that light off?”

Marcus:           Yeah.

John:                Quick log onto my website and look at the signals. There you go.

Marcus:           Interesting. So that might be something for developers that you might want to consider. So if you’re into the Internet of Things, which I’m not connected to the Internet of Things, then give this plugin a try.

John:                There you go. All right, the next one I’ve got here is called User Role Widget Areas. This is kind of a unique one that I’ve had different ways of doing this in the past to be able to have widgets that would display and hide, depending on the role of the user logged into the website. I’d forgotten which ones I had used and I couldn’t find them, so I just decided to do a search and see what’s new out there.

I discovered this one here and this one is kind of different in how they go about the process of putting your widgets into and setting them for user roles. It creates separate widget areas for separate user roles, and you dump your user roles into those widget areas and then you take the other widget that is for that specific user role and then you add that to your sidebar. So it’s kind of a two-step level here; while it seems complex, it’s rather easy to work with and it works rather well to be able to create multiple levels of users for different widgets to have the different widgets show up.

You might need widgets that would show up a login/logout bar. I’ve been working quite a bit lately on an intranet website and I needed to be able to show a logout box for people when they were logged into the intranet. But I needed that box to be completely disappeared if they access the website through the IP addresses that were free to get into the intranet, because otherwise, it asked them to log in when they didn’t need to. So this is one of the ways that I came about doing this to be able to hide that box. It worked quite wonderfully well.

So it’s a really great plugin, very simple to use, and just does exactly what it’s supposed to do, so of course we put this one right at the top as a 5-Dragon rating: User Role Widget Areas.

Marcus:           Hmm…got a lot of 5-star plugins there.

John:                This was a rockin’ day for me, man. I had a full house today.

Marcus:           Wow! Well, I’m going to leave you with something that maybe only Americans can appreciate, but I’m sure that everybody around the world is fascinated by this. We all love Hello Dolly, Matt Mullenweg’s famous plugin.

John:                Oh, yeah.

Marcus:           This one is Hello Trumpy!

John:                [Chuckling] All righty.

Marcus:           So what this does is it features quotes from now elected 45th President-elect of the United States of America, Donald Trump.

John:                Yes.

Marcus:           So whether in a good way or in a bad way, this actually gives some of Donald Trump’s most famous quotes right there in your admin bar. It’s just like Hello Dolly, except it’s Donald Trump. I thought it was pretty funny.

John:                It is funny. It is quite funny.

Marcus:           Regardless, and I will warn you, it’s probably not safe for kids, because Donald Trump does say some things that are —

John:                Yeah…yeah. His quotes are not always safe for kids.

Marcus:           [Laughter] Exactly.

John:                I’ve avoided bringing out the most famous one, just to keep our podcast clean.

Marcus:           Exactly. So if you want to have a little fun, whether you like Trump, whether you don’t like Trump, this is Hello Trumpy, and it gets a 4 out of 5 rating.

John:                There you go, check it out. All right, well that covers up our plugins for this show. I covered up Nav Menu Role, which I gave a 5 to; DCG Display Plugin Data from WordPress.org, which I gave a 5 to; and then User Role Widget Areas, which I gave a 5 to.

Marcus:           And I talked about Show Featured Image Size, which gets a 4, WP-MQTT gets a 4 – that’s the Internet of Things plugin, and Hello Trumpy gets a 4 out of 5, and Donald would call me a loser for giving him 4, but that’s okay.

 

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 280 and we've got plugins for Generating Pinterest Images, Click to Tweet, Disable Password Notifications, Site Lockdown and a great new way to respond to comments, privately.. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 280

It's Episode 280 and we've got plugins for Generating Pinterest Images, Click to Tweet, Disable Password Notifications, Site Lockdown and a great new way to respond to comments, privately.. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #280


It’s Episode 280 and we’ve got plugins for Generating Pinterest Images, Click to Tweet, Disable Password Notifications, Site Lockdown and a great new way to respond to comments, privately.. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #280

John:                Okay, this week here the first plugin I’ve got is called wprequal. This plugin here was sent in to us by Kevin Brent. I did an interview with him last week and the plugin, wprequal, is a great leads plugin that is easy to set up and activate. You add it as a widget to the widget area of your website and it helps you to create leads into your website.

Now, what it’s great for is the leads that it helps you generate is it’s designed for the real estate industry and collecting people who are looking to buy property or obtain mortgages. The plugin is preset in almost everything that’s in it and it goes through, collects their information, prequalifies them as to whether or not they’re actually going to get a mortgage or everything else. It’s much easier to use than all the other leads forms that are used out there. What this plugin has been designed to do is for people to just click a button to answer a series of questions versus having to type in all the answers like every other forms I’ve seen for mortgage collection. They go through and click all the buttons and when they get to the end, all it does is ask for their name, email address, and phone number very simply.

By the time they’ve clicked all the buttons, they’re already ready to type in those four pieces of information and then it gets submitted to you. Now, it was a great plugin – easy to set up unless you needed something more specific. It was easy to control the look and feel of the website, but there was no place in it to change the answers or customize the answers you wanted in it. I did feel the plugin could benefit from the ability to customize the questions and also the ability to change from the default privacy policy and terms that they have set into it. They have a default one that people have to accept the terms when they go to it; it’s preset information.

But other than that, it turned out to be a great plugin. The author is looking at expanding it out and connecting it up to things like Zapier, Salesforce, or other CMS systems, so eventually it’ll be a great plugin. Right now, it’s in pretty good shape. I gave it a 5-Dragon rating for all of its ease of use, so check it out: wprequal.

Marcus:           Very nice! I might have to check that one out. This is a new plugin that’s brand-new. In fact, it’s still in beta. It’s called Grid Canvas and what it does is it is a Pinterest image creator and it creates sort of a grid out of the images that already exist within your posts. You can predetermine what sort of image grid it is. And by grid, I mean sometimes when you post in Facebook and you do an album, it shows one main picture and then maybe a grid of three other photos and you can click on it and all that.

Well, this actually creates that image through the Grid Canvas API. It allows people to tweet the story or the post and it uses that grid image as the actual image that’s in Twitter, Facebook, or whatever – and Pinterest as well. This is really, really nice. I really like this plugin. It’s completely in beta right now, so it’s free to use. It will become a paid plugin and I’m sure that they’ll have some sort of a special for anybody that’s already involved in terms of the beta and upgrading to the paid version. But for now, I would check this out. This is something that really intrigued me.

I tried it out on my site and it was really, really easy to set up and the product that came out the other end was just beautiful. It’s called Grid Canvas – Pinterest Image Creator, and because it’s in beta and not quite ready for prime time, I gave it a 4 out of 5, but I’m sure the pro version once it comes out, I’m really looking forward to reviewing that. I’m sure it would get top level.

John:                Very nice. That could be quite useful for getting your stuff out to Pinterest.

Marcus:           Yeah, an it’s not just Pinterest, either. I mean, it gives you the ability to tweet the picture and do anything, but especially Pinterest because you can automatically put it there. But it’s really, really nice. It’s called Grid Canvas.

John:                Very nice. Well, thinking of tweeting things out, the next plugin I’ve got here is called Better Click to Tweet. This one came about through a client request, noticing that more and more websites out there have that little quote box somewhere in the post article that says, “Click here to tweet,” and then it tweets out that quote that’s been preset. That’s what this plugin does very simply, very easy, and very powerfully.

Once you install and activate it, it adds a new Twitter icon to your editor. You click that icon, it pops up a window, you customize the quote you want, add the hashtags you want – all the little bits and pieces to it. Then you add your username to it and hit enter and it inserts it as a shortcode into your post. Then when the post is presented to your users, it presents it in this nice grid, which you could probably do some customizing CSS to make it stand out a little more. Once they click that, it automatically sends out the exact tweet that you want sent out from your website, saving your visitors of course the hassle of trying to figure out what to say, meaning they’ll more than likely tweet things out a little more often for you, and then you get notifications of it.

I tested it out this morning on our website and after I sent the tweet, I had a couple of retweets on it, so hey, it works quite well. And of course, Better Click to Tweet because it’s so simple, easy, and saves lots of time, it gets one of those top 5-Dragon ratings. A very sweet plugin.

Marcus:           Awesome. Well John, this next plugin falls under that category that we love of lazy plugins, and that is one that you install, turn it on, and never have to deal with it ever again. This one is by our friend, Pippin Williamson, who is pretty known in the WordPress community.

John:                Absolutely.

Marcus:           It makes easy digital downloads and a whole ton of other plugins. This one is called Disable Password Change Notifications, and it does just that. Every time you get a user that changes their password, typically it goes to the administrator and says, “Hey, John Jacob Jingleheimerschmidt just changed their password,” and it’s like okay, I didn’t really need to know that. So if you don’t need to know that, then check out this plugin. It is Disable Password Change Notifications by Pippin Williamson, and I gave it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. Yeah, that can get annoying if you’re working on a website that has lots and lots of users who are constantly resetting their password because they forgot to get in. That’s usually what that indicates.

Marcus:           Exactly, so this will eliminate that and make it an autonomous system that doesn’t bug you.

John:                There you go. Okay, the final plugin I’ve got here today is an exciting one for us. This one here is WPAZ Intranet/Site Lockdown. This is the first official plugin from WP Plugins A to Z show. This is a plugin that I had hired a programmer to help customize with, I wrote some of the code, I customized some, and I hired a programmer to finish this out. This is partly where some of the donors’ money has gone to is providing things like this that we can give back to the community.

Now, this plugin here, what it is designed to do is to allow you to create an intranet site or to completely lock down your website, depending on what you want to do. Creating an intranet site usually means you have to try to keep it on an internal network. But this allows you to create a WordPress website, host it with a hosting provider, and turn it into an intranet site. This plugin will lock down your website so that no one can see anything except the login window – this includes search engines. They can’t get past the login window at all. They can’t even get to the downloads; they can’t view any files in the website – nothing. It keeps them locked out.

Now, you can open it up to specific IP addresses or IP address ranges, which is a very sweet thing. Once they have an account to log in, they can log into the website and then gain access to everything as if they were viewing the website normally, and it doesn’t even show them as being logged in with a toolbar at the top. It’s very nice in that aspect there also. You can use this for your dev sites to lock your dev site down so that no one can get into it. [There are] lots of other uses for it.

If you combine this also with Gravity Forms, you can create a specific registration page that people can register with your website and you can lock that registration down to specific domains. You know, like @johnoverall.com; if you don’t have an address at johnoverall.com, you cannot register. These are the nice functions that are being built into it. Some of these functions will continue to evolve since this is the first iteration of the plugin and we’ll be adding to this as it comes along, because I see lots and lots of uses for it.

At the moment, I would just love to give it a 5 based on the fact that it’s from us. I have to give it a 4-Dragon rating because it’s not thoroughly complete yet but still a great plugin. And if you would like a copy of it, you can get it for free. All you’ve got to do is go to the WP. support.ca website, go to the store, and download it there. It’s $5 but if you use the following plugin code, ********, you get the plugin for free. That’s ********.

Now, this code will not be published, but if you want to get a copy of the code and you didn’t quite catch it, send an email to me: john@wppro.ca, and I’ll send it out to you. The discount code will be good until January 1, 2017. After that, it will always be $5 for the plugin, so check it out. It’s the first plugin from WPPluginsAtoZ.com.

Marcus:           Wow, very nice! Very nice addition. Great. All right, well, let’s wrap up this show with a really nice one. This one is called WP Private Comment Notes, and it lets WordPress admins and moderators add and manage private notes left through the comments system.

So here’s how it works, John: if you are on my site and you read a particular blog post and you leave a comment and you ask me a certain question on it, there may be an instance where I don’t want to reply to you just in another comment. Maybe I want to reply to you privately. So what happens is I can send you a note privately and knowing that I have your email address because that’s what I require to leave a comment, it will email you my private replay to your comment based on this plugin.

John:                Sweet!

Marcus:           So that’s pretty cool. I mean, it’s just a nice way to answer somebody’s question and not continue and continue and continue in the thread. So check it out; it’s called WP Private Comment Notes, and I gave it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Very sweet. That’s a nice way to be able to communicate with administrators.

Marcus:           Sure.

John:                All right, well in this episode I covered up wprequal, which I gave a 5 to; Better Click To Tweet, which I have a 5 to; and the all-new WPAZ Intranet Site/Lockdown Plugin, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I reviewed Grid Canvas – got that a 4 out of 5, Disable Password Change Notifications by Pippin Williamson – gave that one a 5 out of 5, and Private Comment Notes, 5 out of 5.

 

[End of Audio]

 

 

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Transcript of Episode 279

transcript-279All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #279


It’s Episode 279 and we’ve got plugins for Calendar Registrations, Zodiac and Moon Forecasts, Sequential Post Editing, Dummy Payment Gateways and a great new plugin for Writing a Novel. . It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #279

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got this week is called Registrations for The Events Calendar. This plugin here, and as I’m having to face the problem of changing out the events calendar across several websites, because what I was using for the last few years, the company has just so many loops, turns, backwards, and forwards.t they’ve just changed it to the point where it’s no longer the same plugin. But in the process, I’ve been watching this Event Calendar from Modern Tribe rise up. I tried it a few times and never had quite right.

But I had a client come to me several months back using this plugin and I found out that Modern Tribe has come a long way. More and more, such as in the last show when we did a review of a plugin from Modern Tribe, I found another plugin from them. People are building plugins for this plugin, which is a beautiful thing, which means that plugin is going to be super expandable.

This one here, Registrations for The Events Calendar, allows you to take an event and turn it into a registerable event, where people can register, you can collect their email, registration information, everything you need for it, and then you can send out emails to them and track their registrations. The only one thing that I found lacking in the plugin was the ability to charge for the registrations. Other than that, it’s looking pretty good. So who knows? That may be something they add to this plugin – and it’s a relatively new plugin to begin with, so what the heck. Anyway, I gave it a 3-Dragon rating. Check it out: Registrations for The Events Calendar.

Marcus:           I use the Events Calendar on a number of different client sites —

John:                Yeah.

Marcus:           — and it’s really handy. In fact, early on in this year, I did a two-day marathon where I added events throughout the entire year. I had literally preloaded a year’s worth of content in it and it’s pretty nice. The only thing is I always have somewhat of an issue in terms of styling.

John:                That was the only one thing.

Marcus:           Yeah, they did improve that just a little bit, but that’s the only caveat to it that I would say. So if you’re into CSS and you can do, you know, layouts and modifications and things, then you shouldn’t have any problems. But it’s a great plugin.

John:                Yep.

Marcus:           All right, so the first one that I’ve got today is very interesting. It’s called Edit Next Post, and what it does is if you are in the post editor and you’re going to edit a lot of posts, just like what Glen sort of had in terms of a question with his audio comment. What it does is it puts a meta box in the top right of the edit screen and it allows you to go to a different post or page (or custom post type or whatever you want), within that specific post type. So if you’re editing a post, it actually lists all of the rest of the post. John, let’s say we had Episode 279, 278, 276, and we wanted to go through and edit that.

John:                Mm-hmm?

Marcus:           Well, instead of having to go back into the main pages listing, we can edit one page, update it, and then go to that little box in the upper right and then select the next one to edit, and then it just automatically takes you right to the edit screen of that post.

John:                Oh, sweet!

Marcus:           Yeah.

John:                It saves you a couple of steps.

Marcus:           Really easy, saves a ton of times, and it’s one of those lazy plugins we love, and I gave it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Beautiful. Okay – yeah, I like that idea. That’s nice. All right, the next one I’ve got here is called ZodiacPress. Now, this is a great plugin. If you run a metaphysical website or anything of the Wiccan variety or you like zodiacs, horoscopes, and things of that nature – you want to know your charts or you want to offer those up to people, this is a great plugin for you. What it does is it requires a GeoNames account.

Once you get that account set up, you set up the plugin, you go through and tweak all of the settings. People can enter in their birthdate and place and then what it will do is it will generate their birth chart for them. It will generate it on their website, so they can go through the information and you can give specialized readings and interpretations of all the information depending on your knowledge of this field. A really interesting plugin if you’re into the zodiac and into the metaphysical, but it seems like a pretty decent plugin and fairly well built, so check it out: ZodiacPress. I gave it a 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Great. All right, the next one is something for you WooCommerce people out there. This is called Dummy Gateway for WooCommerce, and what it is it’s a dummy payment gateway plugin that you can use for the testing of the checkout process. It’s really easy to set up and it basically is a payment gateway simulator and the entire checkout process and processing procedures can be done, so you could put in a fake credit card and all that and the dummy gateway automatically approves it and everything else. It puts you through the entire process.

Now, I will say this is probably one of the most overlooked things when somebody puts up a store, because they don’t want to put their own credit card in and test it out on PayPal or whatever it happens to be, or Stripe, or any of those. This is a great way to check that out and make sure that everything that needs to fire, in terms of through that payment process, does what it’s supposed to do. And by that, I’m talking about the thank you page, the options to make sure that everything goes exactly as planned, because there’s nothing worse than setting up an entire e-commerce site and then having no sales say for like a month or a week or whatever, and you don’t know why.

Maybe it’s because there was a mistake made somewhere along the line of the payment gateway or there’s very poor onboarding, if this is something like the Membership Coach site. If I didn’t have the right thank you attribution and then one of the things I have is that you get to set up an appointment call with me right away after you pay. These are things that you need to completely go through the process to make sure that all your T’s are crossed and I’s are dotted and all the rest of it. It’s called Dummy Gateway for WooCommerce, and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. Yeah, I saw that one and I was considering reviewing it myself. But yeah, I’m glad that you did.

Marcus:           Yes.

John:                Okay, the final plugin I’ve got here today is another one for the metaphysical. It’s called Daily Moon Forecast and this is a simple plugin that creates a widget or a shortcode you can use on your page or in your sidebars. What it does for you as it tells you what the moon’s current position is, whether it’s a full moon, a dark moon, whether it’s in Scorpio or Cancer or whatever sign it’s currently in, it gives you the ascendency – all those bits of information for those of you that like to follow that information.

It’s a really great add-on if you’re running a metaphysical site, because it helps bring people to your site on a daily basis, so they can check to see where the moon is at. You know, these sorts of things lots of people believe in, lots of people let it think it rules their lives. So if you like this sort of thing or you run a metaphysical website or want to offer up something different to your clients, check it out. It’s called Daily Moon Forecast, and I gave it a 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Hmm, interesting. Well, the final plugin that I have today is something that’s very interesting. It’s called Plan My Novel and what it is it’s a tool that helps writers plan and organize all of the details that have to be handled in order to successfully create and publish a novel.

What it does is a number of things: it covers everything that you need in terms of making a novel, it helps you with outlines, doing different scenes, chapters, it’s got a custom post type for characters. So if you have characters in your novel, it allows you to kind of give the backstory of the character within a custom post type, even put their picture in there, plan it out. It has a budget that you can export to CSV and it has a lot of other things, like documents, manuscript drafts, and research stuff, and it’s all native within WordPress.

I’ve never seen anything like this from WordPress. I’ve seen plenty of desktop applications that do this kind of thing, but this is the first WordPress version that I’ve seen. It’s probably not good for a nonfiction or something that doesn’t have a lot of characters in the story. Like I don’t think I could ever do a – let’s say if I was doing a WordPress Plugins book, this wouldn’t be what I would use. I would use this for some other thing where maybe John and I are superheroes and we save the world with WordPress plugins. But it’s very cool if you are into writing fiction type novel stuff. This is an absolute must in terms of checking this out. I rated it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Yeah, that’s very nice. When I saw there, the first thing I could think of was my wife who has taken up writing in the last six months again and is working herself up to bigger and bigger stories. She’s got characters that she would like to expand on and I can see myself having to install this on her website soon to allow her to start mapping things out.

Marcus:           Right.

John:                So thanks for bringing this one to my attention because yeah, I didn’t even see it. But yeah, I liked it.

Marcus:           Great!

John:                And I’m sure she will. All right, well I covered up in this week Registrations for The Events Calendar, which I gave a 3 to; ZodiacPress, which I gave a 3 to; and Daily Moon Forecast, which I gave a 3 to.

Marcus:           And I talked about Edit Next Post – gave that one a 5; Dummy Gateway for WooCommerce gets a 4; and we just discussed Plan My Novel, which gets a 5 out of 5.

 

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 279 and we've got plugins for Calendar Registrations, Zodiac and Moon Forecasts, Sequential Post Editing, Dummy Payment Gateways and a great new plugin for Writing a Novel. . It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 278

It's Episode 279 and we've got plugins for Calendar Registrations, Zodiac and Moon Forecasts, Sequential Post Editing, Dummy Payment Gateways and a great new plugin for Writing a Novel. . It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #278


It’s Episode 278 and we’ve got plugins for Page Insertion, Google Calendar, Copy to Clipboard, Video Comments, Menu Shortcodes and Archive Control. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z


Episode #278

John:                All right, this week here, my first plugin is called Insert Pages. This one here is something that I brought in for a project I’ve been working on. What it does is it makes the chore of adding page content into another page an easy task to do. I did find a couple of limitations in what I was trying to accomplish.

What I was trying to do was I was trying to display the contest we now have on the WP Plugins site inside a regular post. But due to the type of content being created through the plugin that’s used, it didn’t quite work right. But I did test it in other areas and it works pretty great for bring in page content into another page. A pretty simple little plugin – it works fairly well. It also allows you to include any content you want, so check it out: Insert Pages, and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Hmm, very nice. I like that a lot. All right, the next one is a plugin by a gentleman named Dan Delaney, and this plugin is something really great. It’s called Dan’s Embedder for Google Calendar and what it does is Dan actually created this out of the need to display Google Calendars in both list and full view format that was also mobile-friendly, customizable with a shortcode, and pretty easy to style, and so that’s exactly what he created here.

All you need is a public Google Calendar or multiple Google Calendar API key, which is real easy to do and real easy to get. This will display your Google Calendar right on your webpage and what’s great about it is if you have regularly recurring events, then what you can do is have them added to their calendar so that they have everything that the need. It really saves a lot of time. It’s somewhat difficult to do this in WordPress without a plugin like this, so I gave it a 4 out of 5. It’s called Dan’s Embedder for Google Calendar.

John:                Very sweet. As more and more people are using Google Calendars to share their stuff and keep track of things – I know I do – it’s very nice.

Marcus:           Yeah.

John:                Especially since I finally managed to get it to work with my phone.

Marcus:           Yeah, yeah. It’s really nice and if you do any kind of recurring events, training, things like that. For me, I wanted to enter in all of the live training and mastermind calls for the membershipcoach.com site and this is what I’m using.

John:                Very nice. Okay, the next plugin I’ve got here is called menu shortcode, and again, this was for a project I was working on and I was trying to fit a menu into a place that you don’t normally fit a menu. What this plugin helps you do is using a shortcode, it allows you to grab the name of the menu and put it into the shortcode, and then put the shortcode into the place on your website and have that menu appear for you. Then you can customize and tweak it in the shortcode for some displays.

The problem I ran into was the area I was trying to work at did not execute shortcodes properly, so it didn’t work for me. But I found that it could be a very viable option for other people and to use menus in other places where you might want a menu but they wouldn’t normally go. The only caveat here is wherever you put it, you have to be able to execute that shortcode. If you can’t execute the shortcode, it’s just not going to happen. But other than that, a really great plugin. It allows you to do any tweaks to the CSS of the menu that you’re going to display – the little bits and pieces. All in all, a pretty decent plugin. I gave it a 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           I got to comment about that.

John:                What’s that?

Marcus:           Okay, so you can use Shortcodes Everywhere. Have you tried that?

John:                For some reason – oh, I didn’t try Shortcodes Everywhere – no.

Marcus:           Okay, so that’s an additional – there’s two different plugins. There’s one called Shortcodes Everywhere and there’s one called Shortcodes Anywhere or Everywhere. One hasn’t been updated in a while and one has. But that opens it up.

Now, my second question for you is does the menu – is it a vertical menu or is it a horizontal menu, like a navigation menu?

John:                I was trying to make a navigation menu in the top area.

Marcus:           And did it do it?

John:                No, I finally ended up going a whole different route, but that’s okay.

Marcus:           Oh.

John:                That’s what happens sometimes. You want to do something and you realize no, this just isn’t working. Let’s take another track.

Marcus:           Because I did have a project that needed a navigation menu, but I couldn’t find a good plugin for inserting that that didn’t just make it like it was a sidebar menu.

John:                Yeah.

Marcus:           I tried to make a navigation but I never could find anything, so I just ended up doing it with just a child theme and actually inserting it with PHP.

John:                Yeah, I took a whole different track with this project but that’s okay. Sometimes that happens; you want to do something. The project goes yes and then you get working and you realize it’s just not going to work and it’s not worth the four or five extra hours to do it. You just back up and go a different way.

Marcus:           Yeah. All right, my plugin – my next one here – is called Videotape and it’s pretty cool. It’s very simple; what it does is just like what we used our SpeakPipe for on our own website. This allows you to be able to intake video comments in your commenting system, so it allows people to actually record a video from their own webcam, their phone, or whatever, and leave you a video comment on your posts.

John:                Cool!

Marcus:           Pretty neat, really easy to use – it’s just kind of a Flash interface type of a thing. You’ve seen these things all the time anytime you go into a webinar or anything like that. It just asks for a little bit of control or to be able to use the camera, which it does, and I rated this one a 4 out of 5.

John:                Yeah, that can be kind of cool. If we get more interaction, we could put something like that on our site.

Marcus:           Right, yeah.

John:                All right, the final one I’ve got here today is called Archive Control. This one was sent in to us by Jesse Sutherland and it’s a free plugin. I started to test it out but I didn’t quite have a place to test it, but it still checked out pretty good for the little bits and pieces I did use it on in my sandbox page.

What the plugin allows you to do is to customize your archive listings – all your different archive listings be they tags, custom post types, or categories, and customize and modify the title, adding a featured image, including content before or after the list that’s shown on the page. You can also change the order display, you can shorten down the number that are displayed on the page, and include page nation for it. You can adjust the terms and more.

The plugin performed pretty well and it can help you do some organization to your categories, tags and custom post types. There are a couple of caveats to custom post types: you may have to enable a couple of things in there. But all in all, the plugin performed quite well. It’s called Archive Control and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Cool. I like that. All right, the final plugin for the show and from me today is called Clip to Clipboard. It is a simple little plugin that allows you to copy whole paragraphs of your site and just click it to the clipboard elsewhere. So it’s really handy when somebody needs to copy and paste something like code or an embed script, CSS, or whatever they use. Maybe it’s an email template or something like that that you just want them to have one click and then everything in that section gets copied. It’s called Click to Clipboard and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. A nice timesaver.

Marcus:           Very handy.

John:                Okay, and in this episode here I covered up Insert Pages, which I gave a 4 to; menu shortcode, which I gave a 3 to; and then Archive Control, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I’ve got fours across the board: Dan’s Embedder for Google Calendar gets a 4 out of 5, Videotape gets a 4 out of 5, and Click to Clipboard gets a 4 out of five.

 

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 276 and we've got plugins for keeping track of post creation times, Quizzes, Facebook Live Video, Site Notificiations and a Reviews Plugin that will have you seeing stars in Google. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 276

All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #276


It’s Episode 276 and we’ve got plugins for keeping track of post creation times, Quizzes, Facebook Live Video, Site Notificiations and a Reviews Plugin that will have you seeing stars in Google. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!It's Episode 276 and we've got plugins for keeping track of post creation times, Quizzes, Facebook Live Video, Site Notificiations and a Reviews Plugin that will have you seeing stars in Google. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #276

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got this week here is called Quiz Cat, and this is a premium plugin. It was submitted to us by David Hehenberger – hopefully, I got that right – and from fatcatapps.com. What this one here is, this is viral quizzes is definitely a thing. You know, you see them all the time in Facebook, Twitter – all kinds of places where people put a quiz up. You know, “What Superhero Are You?” “What Type of Cat Are You?” – blah, blah, on and on.

Well, creating those things, you often have to do them on other people’s websites where they get to collect the data that you’re trying to collect. You should be able to do it on your own site and that’s what this plugin does for you. It allows you to create those viral quizzes on your website and it’s a relatively easy plugin to do. It even helps you collect emails where people will have to submit their email to you to get the answers to the quiz that you’ve created. It integrates with MailChimp and Zapier and so you can collect and organize those emails into your mailing list.

You create unique quizzes tailored to your website focus. You can create two types of quizzes: you can create points quizzes or a quiz that tells them what kind of superhero they are if they answer all the things in the correct direction. The personality quizzes are great; they’re lots of fun. It doesn’t take too long to create a quiz if you have something in mind. Who knows? You might be real creative and get one that goes viral. It’s a really good plugin.

I found it worked fairly well, although I did have some issues in the MU environment, which is what WP Plugins is built on. It just didn’t seem to quite function correctly. I’ve contacted the developers to see if we can help sort it out for them. It could be fault because I’ve got so many plugins in there right now, there could be a plugin conflict also. But the first place I go is an MU conflict when a plugin doesn’t work. So anyway, it’s a great plugin; check it out. It’s called Quiz Cat and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Cool! Yeah, that’s a great lead magnet – really great in terms of getting people sign up to your list, because those things are completely viral. I’d be curious to see if somebody can make an entire site out of that. That would be really cool.

John:                You probably could.

Marcus:           Yeah. So let’s go to my first plugin. John, I’ve been trying desperately to blog every single day and it just hasn’t happened for me. I got to five in a row and then it just like hit me and it’s a little tough. So, you know, I use a project management system where I log all my time and sometimes it’s difficult to track how long it takes to make a post from start to finish when you’re going back into the editor ten different times over the course of three days. This plugin helps with that. It’s called Post Worktime Logger, and it’s a plugin that’s essentially a tool that tracks all of the time you put into making each post.

It’s a timer that shows exactly how long it takes in the editor, so as you’re in the editor, the clock starts ticking so you can tell exactly how much time you’ve put into a particular post. That’s great for people that are content people that do things for clients and they want to be able to bill it, or just for yourself to just see how long and how much time you used making a particular post. It’s called Post Worktime Logger – great tool for tracking time. I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. The only question I would have about it is does it continue to track the time if say you walk away from the computer screen and get caught up making lunch for your kids or something else that drags you away from the screen?

Marcus:           I think it does.

John:                Okay.

Marcus:           I don’t think there’s a pause option.

John:                Well, what I’m thinking is inactivity, like no mouse on the screen or something that indicates that someone is actually sitting in front of the computer. That’s the only thing that I would do, because it happens to me. I’ll get in the middle of something and all of the sudden my kids want something to eat, I’ve got to get up, go from the computer, go get them the food, and I forget that I’ve left something on the screen.

Marcus:           True.

John:                So that’s the only thing. Other than that, it sounds like a fantastic plugin. It would be a great thing to have.

Marcus:           Yeah, I’m looking at it right now. It says it “checks activity and only updates working time…”

John:                Oh.

Marcus:           If you really worked on that.

John:                Okay, I’m going to have to install it and give it a test, because I would love to know how long it takes me to get my posts made everywhere I do them.

Marcus:           Yeah, so I mean it’s just a little meta box that’s on the right side in the post editor that tells your current and total work time on it.

John:                Sweet. All right, the next plugin I’ve got here is another premium plugin that was sent into us by Kuba Mikita and it’s called Notification – actually, it’s a free plugin – sorry. This plugin is one that allows you to create notifications for just about everything that happens in your WordPress website. You can create custom email notifications that go out to you for all of the common triggers and things that you might want to track, especially if you’ve got a site where you have people doing additional work on your site.

It will trigger if they post or a page is published or updated, if it’s changed, if it’s modified. You can set up email triggers that happen on these events. You can go through other triggers, such as pingbacks or trackbacks on posts and pages. If those aren’t enough, you can even register custom triggers to your sites. If you have a specific event that you want to occur, you can register that custom trigger event to this plugin and when that event happens on your website, it’ll send an email to you telling you that this event has happened.

You can determine what email addresses it goes to, so you can send them to multiple email addresses or just to the default admin email address. There’s lots of ways to use this for tracking the activity in your website for the events that will normally occur. This helps ensure that things are happening when they’re supposed to happen.

All in all, it looks to be a pretty great plugin and it helps ensure you get those important email notifications from your website. Check it out; it’s called Notification, and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Cool. All right, a lot of people right now are into and using Facebook Live Video. It sort of took over.

John:                It took over Blab and other live video feeds.

Marcus:           Yeah! So there are times where you’d like to actually take people off of Facebook and be able to show a video maybe on your website, and this plugin lets you do it. It’s called WP Facebook Live Video, and it displays a live video from your Facebook page or your profile page on any WordPress post or page, just using a small, little shortcode.

So whenever you have a live video, it actually pops up and shows the video that’s live right now. And if you don’t have a live video going on at that time, it shows nothing, so it’s great to use on the sidebar, a dedicated live page – like if you’re going to do marcuscouch.com/live – a great way to have it to where you don’t have to have connections in Facebook and everybody hooked into you and all that kind of stuff. It just lets people see it directly from your webpage on WordPress, so I gave it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice! That could be very useful. So you mentioned briefly there that you could put it into a sidebar widget so that it’s always visible.

Marcus:           Yes.

John:                That’s an excellent thought. Yeah, the thought that occurred to me was to have it pop up if a video suddenly came live and someone was on your site too.

Marcus:           Well, it doesn’t pop up in the sense of like a typical pop-up like we’re thinking of. But if you put it on the sidebar and if you go live, then yes, that shortcode Facebook Live video shortcode will take over and show that live video, so you can put it anywhere you want: the sidebar, posts, pages – anything.

John:                That’s sweet. A nice way to promote yourself and if someone happens to be visiting, the video starts playing, and there they have you.

Marcus:           Yeah, and I would think you know also that maybe a good way, if you wanted to have people to say sign up to a pseudo webinar or a walkthrough or something like that —

John:                Yeah?

Marcus:           — that would be great, because then you can have them go to one page where all your offers are, all your call to actions – everything. So check it out: WP Facebook Live Video.

John:                There you go. Okay, the final plugin I’ve got here is ACF Theme Code Pro. This is a premium plugin. It was sent into us by Aaron Rutley, and while I didn’t use this plugin because I’m not using Advanced Custom Fields (which this plugin requires), I have used Advanced Custom Fields in the past.

What this plugin does is it helps you generate the code necessary to place into your theme for custom fields. It’s a really great plugin. You set it up, you create your custom themes, you hit the buttons, it produces the code you need to place into your theme. They do have a free version that you can try out and there’s a link in the show notes for the free version off of the WordPress Repository.

It will help ensure that you get your particular task done using the advanced custom field plugin. It looks like it’s going to be a great help for those that use advanced custom field plugin to help ease the pain of getting all the custom fields into their theme, so check it out. It’s a really great looking plugin: ACF Theme Code Pro, and I gave it a 4-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Cool! I’m going to try that. Okay, I had a client last week come to me and talk about SERPS – the Search Engine Result Pages in Google. They noticed that a competitor was showing up for similar kinds of products and they had a star rating listed on their results. You know, you’ve seen that. You’ve searched for something in particular and you see like a rating system that Google puts in their search engine results.

This plugin lets you do that. It’s called Reviews Plus, and it’s a free WordPress plugin and it allows you to manage and display customer reviews for products, services, any kind of content you want. This essentially replaces the entire comments section for a selected post type and it provides a full rating summary that’s fully compatible with Google guidance in order to show up in the results with the review stars in the listing. A great plugin, easy to set up, fantastic to use, good results – gave it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Very nice! Yeah, that can be quite a benefit nowadays that so many people place so much emphasis on the ratings they find for everything.

Marcus:           Yes.

John:                Whether those ratings have any value or not is irrelevant; they still seem to place emphasis on them.

Marcus:           Yeah, it suckers me in. I always click on those.

John:                [Laughter] Yeah, I actually ignore them myself. I just treat the ratings as mostly false and continue along the way.

Okay, well, that’s a great roundup. I covered up today Quiz Cat, which I gave a 4 to; Notification, which I gave a 4 to; and ACF Theme Code Pro, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I spoke about Post Worktime Logger and gave that a 4 out of 5, WP Facebook Live Video, 4 out of 5, and we just talked about Reviews Plus, gives you a 5 out of 5.

[End of Audio]

 

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Wordcamps, Woo Commerce Dynamic Quantities

Transcript of Episode 275

Wordcamps, Woo Commerce Dynamic QuantitiesAll transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #275


It’s Episode 275 and we’ve got plugins for Custom Sidebars, Admin UI, , Integrating Magento and a new way to clean out old images in the media library. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #275

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got this week here is called Custom Sidebars and it’s a freemium plugin from WPMU DEV, so they do have a paid version of this plugin. What the Custom Sidebars is for is to allow you to create new widgeted areas on your website that you can then apply to anywhere in your website. You can apply it down to the user level, you can have the widget appear on specific posts or pages, you can have it show for specific categories, you can have it display everywhere, you can put it in the footer, and you can put it for memberships.

There’s all kinds of ways to use this. If you need even more customizations, they do have a pro version which allows you to assign the widget to specific user roles such as editors or administrators, you can also then create clones of these widgets to share across other websites that you might work on, so you can synch the widgets across websites, import and export custom sidebars, and even more.

It’s really great when you move on to the pro version of it. Of course, you’ve got to become a member of WPMU DEV, which is quite affordable now. But all in all, a pretty great plugin. I tested out both versions of it: the free version, I give it a 4-Dragon rating and the pro version gets a top 5-Dragon rating. There we go.

Marcus:           Awesome. All right, the first one I’ve got today is a WooCommerce plugin and it is called Dynamic Quantity Table. Now you can set up different pricing tiers based on how many items somebody orders, so that if you order like one to three, the price is $10. Order, you know, four to seven, it’s going to be $9 – on and on and on – quantity discounts.

What’s nice is this plugin actually creates a table and displays it within the product page itself to show you the complete breakdown so that you can see what the different prices and the quantity breakdowns are right next to the product. A really cool plugin and I gave it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice – a nice way to do things.

Marcus:           Yeah.

John:                The next plugin I’ve got here is called WP Admin UI plus pro, so this is another one that’s got a free version and a pro version. It was sent into us by Benjamin Denis at WPAdminUI.net. He sent us in the pro version to test out and of course I didn’t realize that you actually needed to install the free version before you can use the pro version. So at any rate, they have a free version.

The free version is pretty nice and what it does is it allows you to do some pretty thorough customizations of the WordPress UI. It allows control over items such as the image quality of images being uploaded to the Media Library, you can add columns such as dimensions, EXIF info, and more. If you have multiple types of files, you can have filtering. It can be a real timesaver. You can get customizations for login screen, which they have my new favorite checkbox, which allows you to disable login by email, and so much more.

The thoroughness of this plugin in the pro version (which is what I tested out) is very extensive. It allows so much customizations: you can change the headers, the admin bar, who can see what pieces – it’s just a very thorough plugin. I didn’t get the price on it but it looks like it’s probably worth what they’re charging for it. So of course, pro version is a Top Dragon rating. I gave it a 5 here. Check it out: WP Admin UI plus pro.

Marcus:           Excellent. Good job on that. Okay, the next one is an experimental plugin that I just toyed with a little bit. You can try it for yourself and see how it works for you. It really depends on what your site structure is and how you’ve used media, but this is called Clean Unused Media.

What it does is it scans all of the uploaded media to your site and it finds the media that is not attached to anything. It works with posts, pages, thumbnails, favicons, custom post types, advanced custom fields – all of that. It scans all of it and then gives you the option to delete media that you have in the installation but you’re not using. And that happens a lot because sometimes you’ll upload an image and then you’ll go and say, “Okay, that’s not the size I want,” and then you’ll upload another image. Then the other one that’s out of place that you didn’t want there to begin with is still there, so this helps to find those, locate them, and exterminate them. So this one gets a 4 out of 5 rating.

John:                Very nice! It sounds like a great way to clean up the media library and help keep your file count down, which some hosting providers limit you to the number of files you have on your website.

Marcus:           Yes. I have a site that is for a client that I’m going to try this on in a stage capacity, so that means I’m going to move it to a stage site and then test this.

John:                Oh, nice.

Marcus:           And it has 90,000 images in the media library, so hopefully I can —

John:                Clean it up a little?

Marcus:           — clean it up, yes.

John:                Absolutely, so a great plugin there, folks. Okay, the final one I’ve got here today is called Wordcamp Dashboard Widget. It’s a free plugin located in the WordPress Repository and it’s a simple plugin. What it does is it will show you all the upcoming and past Wordcamps for the year that are listed at the Wordcamp.org website. It shows them in your dashboard as a widget and it’s a pretty decent way to find the information out. What I felt could be improved with this plugin is having the ability to display it on your website.

When I saw it initially, I hoped, “Hey, this would be a cool way to show folks what the Wordcamps up and coming are on the website.” It turns out it only works in your admin dashboard at the moment. So other than that, a great little plugin – very simple, helps you find out where the Wordcamps are, when they’re coming up, or which ones have already gone by. Check it out: Wordcamp Dashboard Widget – I gave it a 3-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           Yeah, that bummed me out, too. I thought that was something we could use for our show site.

John:                That’s what I was going to do with it. I was going to put it up on the show site.

Marcus:           Yep. All right, finally, those of you that work with Magento, it is a WordPress – it’s not like WooCommerce. It’s actually its own platform, so it’s just like WordPress in the sense that you install it almost the same way with PHP and MySQL and things like that but it’s separated. A lot of people use Magento because it’s relatively powerful in what it can do.

It does have sort of its own theme system and all of that. If you wanted to work with either yourself or a client that’s using Magento too, it’s really nice to be able to integrate that into WordPress, so thus this plugin. It’s called Magento 2 WordPress Integration and here’s what it does. It integrates the two together so that users are cross-pollenated between both sites and you have a unified user experience. It shares session and cart data, navigation menus, header, footer products, layout elements, and all of the static blocks that is available in Magento, and you can insert into WordPress with a short code —

John:                Nice!

Marcus:           — which I thought was really nice. So this gives you the ability to – if you find somebody that has Magento and they’re trying to use it for their entire structure of their company presence or website or whatever, and you want to pitch them to be able to do a WordPress backend, frontend, whatever you want to call it, this is a great plugin to do that. It’s called Magento 2 WordPress Integration, and I gave it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice. Yeah, those sorts of things are needed more and more these days.

Marcus:           Yes. There’s so much in terms of compatibility or incompatibility, rather, when you deal with other platforms outside of the WordPress eco space and this is something that helps to bridge that gap, so check it out.

John:                All right. Well, this week I covered up Custom Sidebars, which I gave a 4 and a 5 to; WP Admin UI plus pro, which I gave a 5 to; and then Wordcamp Dashboard Widget, which I gave a 3 to.

Marcus:           And I talked about WooCommerce Dynamic Quantity Tables – gave that one a 4; Clean Unused Media gets a 4; and Magento 2 WordPress Integration also gets a 4.

[End of Audio]

 

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