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It's Episode 282 and we've got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 282

It's Episode 282 and we've got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #282


It’s Episode 282 and we’ve got plugins for Login Timeout, Post Tables, Taking Donations, Coupon URLs and a new plugin for building and ordering a pizza with WooCommerce. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z


Episode #282

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got this week here is WP Login Timeout Settings. What this plugin came about, I was in need of adding an automatic logout system on an intranet I’ve been working on so that when someone gets on the website and they might login from their computer or maybe they login from a hotel computer or something.

It happens way too many times people walk away from the computer and they leave themselves logged in and they just forget. That can be a very dangerous thing, so what we needed was some way to ensure that if someone left themselves logged in, it automatically logged them out of the website. While WordPress has this in place, it usually takes a week or two for that login to expire. We needed it to happen within minutes of lack of activity on the website. So this one here I checked out first to see what it would do. While this plugin helps you set it up, it allows you to override the default auto logout time of the WordPress site. You can set a timeout for the remember me function, you can also set a shorter logout for the different roles you have.

It had a couple of limitations that just didn’t quite work with what I was doing, but it will work in some aspects for what you might need. You can set it up to have a redirect to a special logout page after the auto logout. All in all, not a bad plugin. It worked fairly well. I did however, because it just didn’t provide all the functionality that I thought it should have had, I gave it a 3-Dragon rating. Check it out: WP Login Timeout Settings.

Marcus:           All right. Well, the first one that I’ve got today is something that’s pretty cool. It’s called Custom Donations, and it allows you to accept a user-entered custom donation amount through PayPal, and this could even include a set-your-own recurring donation as well.

This plugin was actually created in response to PayPal changing some of the functionality of their donate buttons, and that just happened in October. It allows users access to features which PayPal made a lot harder to customize and access, so this one will handle it all right within WordPress. Check it out. It’s called Custom Donations, and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Sweet! That’ll be quite nice for those using custom donation buttons.

Marcus:           Mm-hmm. Yes.

John:                Okay, the next one I’ve got here is another auto-logout plugin. It’s called Idle User Logout and this plugin here turned out to be a bit better for handling logouts. What it does is it looks for inactivity on the webpage. Someone logs in, the mouse doesn’t move, the keyboard doesn’t click, and it looks for that activity on the page. After a set number of minutes that you decide and set, it auto logs them out.

Now, one of the great features here is you can have it pop up a reminder window, although there’s a limitation in this window, which I’ve contacted the developer and I’m working with him to do some customizations for it so there’s a pop-up window that people can click on to continue or ignore.

All in all, it was much more functional for setting up in this particular instance where we needed it so if someone walked away, after five minutes of inactivity, it automatically logged them out. That was one of the big things that we wanted to look for was that it noticed the activity. Other than that, it was a really great plugin and currently I’m giving it a rating of 4 Dragons, but after the added functionality I’m talking to the developer for, it may pop it up to a 5. But hey, check it out: Idle User Logouts.

Marcus:           Very cool. The next one I’ve got is a WooCommerce plugin. This one is titled URL Coupons for WooCommerce, and it does just that. So once you create a coupon or a promo code within WooCommerce, this actually gives you a unique store link for each coupon on your website. Let’s just say I had WPAZ for the coupon. I could say Membershipcoach.com/WPAZ would take you not only to the product that you need to go to, but it will automatically apply that WPAZ promo code.

John:                Oh, sweet!

Marcus:           So you can hide the coupon fields within the URL as well and it also applies the link to graphics or anything else like that that you can add with just one click in your newsletters, emails, whatever you happen to do. All you have to do is click that link and it goes to the site, adds the product, and applies the coupon. Really handy, very easy to use, and I rated it a 4 out of 5.

John:                Yeah, that’s a great plugin, especially when you’re using your email marketing or other promo pieces.

Marcus:           Right!

John:                People — save them a click; you help encourage them to buy.

Marcus:           Yeah, whatever you can do to make it faster and easier, and dealing with promo codes sometimes is a real pain because they deal with mobile use and sometime it capitalizes the first letter in the coupon.

John:                Oh, yeah.

Marcus:           Sometimes it’s all caps or case-sensitive, and this just alleviates all that stuff, so you know which product it is and which coupon you get, so check it out.

John:                Excellent. Okay, the final one I’ve got here today is called Post Table Pro. This is a premium plugin; it was sent into us by Katie from Barn2.co.uk, and I interviewed her last week, so go back into the website and check out Interview 8. It was a really great interview and at that time, I hadn’t checked out the plugin yet, but I’ve since had a chance to check out this plugin.

It’s a really great plugin and what it does for you is it allows you to put a table via shortcode into your website that will create a table based upon your posts, your custom post types, pages, and then it lists all those tables up. It puts an image, the title, the excerpt or content of the post, and then other information in there. Then you can sort that information by clicking at the top of the table, so you can sort it alphabetically by the tables or the title name or it’s also got a built-in search function that searches within that particular table for the information you’re looking for.

One of the things that I’m experimenting with right now and I’m finding it to not work too badly at all is we have a lot of podcasts – about 281 out there already – this will make 282, and that’s a lot of plugins that we’ve reviewed. We’re trying to find a way for people to look back in the shows to find the plugins. This is not doing too bad of a job of finding those plugins when you search for a plugin by name or type. The problem I ran into with it right now is it didn’t work so well in the MU environment. I managed to test it on my own website where the show is also duplicated at and it works very nicely. But as far as the MU environment goes, I’m going to have to talk to the developers and see if it’s the problem with the way I have the MU environment or if there’s a conflict in the plugin – most likely me and all the plugins I’m running on our website right now.

But other than that, this is a really great plugin. The functionality is great and it’s very speedy. They’ve also got a couple of other specialized plugins that create a table for WooCommerce, so you’ll want to go back and listen to the interview where we talk about those other plugins they have or just go check out this plugin and check out their other stuff. A great plugin – I gave it a 4-Dragon rating, and it’s called Post Table Pro.

Marcus:           Excellent. Well John, you know, back in the 80s when I had my very first computer, I was one of the very few people that actually got a printer when they first came out.

John:                Wow, you were rich!

Marcus:           Oh, right. And the nice thing about it is I was able to make a deal with the local pizza shop so that I could print out their menus and then we would just photocopy those and we did a nice exchange, so I would have pizza as I was growing up each week.

John:                Hey, that’s a bonus.

Marcus:           I got a free pizza. Well, you may get your chance to do the same thing with WordPress, everyone. This plugin is called PizzaTime, and if you’re interested in making websites for a pizza establishment, this is a pretty great plugin to do it. What it is is a virtual pizza builder for WooCommerce, so it has full WooCommerce integration, it has 25 premade pizza ingredients, you can add your own custom ingredients, you can modify the left and right sides of the pizza differently for different toppings. You can have regular portions, lite portions, extra portions, and there’s full photos and descriptions of the ingredients. You can also do a maximum ingredient limit on the pizza and the pizza image will adjust accordingly —

John:                Nice!

Marcus:           — as you put new stuff on there. It’s totally responsive and completely translation-ready as well. This is a very fun plugin, very cool. I wish I owned a pizza shop now. I rated it a perfect 5 out of 5.

John:                Sweet! That’s pretty cool that it actually does that kind of like ordering from Dominos, where it decorates your pizza as you go.

Marcus:           That’s right.

John:                Hey, gotta love that, man. People love the interactivity.

Marcus:           Yeah, and it means that they don’t screw the pizza up, either.

John:                Yeah, absolutely. All right, well in this episode I covered up WP Login Timeout Settings, which I gave a 3 to; Idle User Logout, which I gave a 4 to; and then Post Table Pro, which I gave a 4 to.

Marcus:           And I reviewed Custom Donations, which gets a 4 out of 5, URL Coupons gets a 4 out of 5, and we just talked about PizzaTime, which gets a 5 out of 5.

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

Transcript of Episode 281

It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!All transcripts start from the point in the show where we head off into the meat and potatoes. They are the complete verbatim of Marcus and John’s discussion of the weekly plugins we have reviewed.

WordPress Plugins A to Z Podcast and Transcript for Episode #281


It’s Episode 281 and we’ve got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!


Episode #281

John:                Okay, the first plugin I’ve got here this week is called Nav Menu Roles. Now what this one’s for is when you’ve got your nav menus, there’s oftentimes where you need to limit access to different items in the nav menu and there’s multiple ways to go about this. You can write code, you can have shorts, you can do all kinds of things, but I wanted a simple method. I got tired of all the headaches involved with it, so I thought well maybe somebody has created a plugin by now that makes that job easy. And sure enough, as they say, “There’s an app for that,” well there’s a plugin for that.

This one here is very simple to set up. You set it up, activate it, and then you get to go into your menus and you choose the menu items, hit the drop-down, and then you can choose to show or hide that menu item, depending upon their role, whether they be administrator, a member, a user, subscriber – whatever – choose their roles. You can hide menu items quick and easy and it works beautiful. This is one of those quick, simple, easy, lazy plugins that we just thoroughly enjoy, so I had to give this one a top 5-Dragon rating. Check it out: Nav Menu Roles.

Marcus:           All right, very nice. Okay, first one I’ve got here is called Show Featured Image Size in Admin TopBar. Come on, guys. Condense these names. This is way too [inaudible]. This is a really simple plugin. What it does is it displays the image size, the resolution, of whatever the featured image is on the admin bar up at the top. It’s really handy because then you don’t have to look up the default size of each featured image or anything like that every time you post. So it will change according to what post you’re looking at and show you what the resolution of that featured image is.

Now, it’s handy because sometimes it gets cut off or it’s skewed or sometimes there’s text that you might lay out that just ends up getting chopped in different sizes. This is a handy reference to let you know what you’re looking at when you’re developing a size to kind of get that featured image size exactly the same dimensions that you need it to be in order to work well. So I rated this one a 4 out of 5.

John:                Very nice! Excellent. Okay, the next one I’ve got here for you today is called DCG Display Plugin Data from WordPress.org. Now, this is a very nice plugin and this is one that I’ve been looking for for quite some time. We’ve had other options to be able to pull the plugin data from the WordPress Repository. You know, all of the information about star rating, the location, the URL for it, the author, and all those bits of information. That’s always been problematic, because I’ve had to use multiple shortcodes to pull it together. Well, no longer.

This plugin here uses one shortcode and you can put pieces into the shortcode to show more or less information. But if you use the default shortcode, it shows the short snippet of that plugin information from WordPress.org. You can use it in multiple areas and how I’m using it mainly for us, I’ll start to use it with our show notes, so all the free plugins will always show the latest information, instead of the short bits of information we’ve been showing for a very long time.

But the main reason I wanted this is in the store of the WordPress A to Z website is I wanted to be able to have an area where the plugins that we find fantastic, we can easily share with people, and they can go over to our store, locate them, and then download them at a later time. They’re going to be sorted by types and other things as it goes along, and this plugin just made that job so easy to do to be able to display that information. It’s one of those beautiful, lazy plugins that actually works the way it’s supposed to, and of course, this one gets another 5-Dragon rating.

Marcus:           All right, this next plugin is called WP-MQTT. Now what it does is it connects WordPress to the Internet of Things.

John:                Oh, wow.

Marcus:           Yes, this plugin will automatically send MQTT protocol messages when something happens on your website. MQTT is a machine-to-machine Internet of Things connectivity protocol. You know, I know that the Internet of Things is supposed to be so that your washer and dryer can talk to each other and – I don’t know, tell you when the clothes are done and your fridge is supposed to tell you when you’re out of milk and eggs and all that kind of stuff. I’m not quite sure what this could be used for, but I like the idea.

John:                Yeah.

Marcus:           I like the idea of maybe when I go to a certain page, the lights come on, or when a sale happens. Maybe I’ve got something that —

John:                Have a bell go off while you’re watching your favorite movie.

Marcus:           Yeah, or maybe it ices down a cold beer for me when I get a big sale.

John:                Hey, there you go.

Marcus:           Who knows? Who knows. You guys tell me what you would use something like this for and I’ll definitely take that suggestion in consideration. In the meantime, I gave this one a 4 out of 5.

John:                Sounds like it could be interesting to use and of course, the first thing that popped into my mind was a way to expand that giant botnet that attacked a few weeks ago.

Marcus:           Oh, great! [Laughter]

John:                Sorry, Internet of Things, man: wonderful and scary at the same time.

Marcus:           Yeah. You know, I don’t know. I don’t have anything – I don’t believe I have anything else that’s connected to the internet. I know my washing machine or my fridge is not. But who knows?

John:                I have my phone, my computers, and my TV and my DVD player.

Marcus:           Now, here’s another thing: I wonder if it goes the other way, which is the other things can connect to your WordPress site.

John:                That’s the whole problem.

Marcus:           And give you a nice dashboard.

John:                And that’s what is eventually occurring.

Marcus:           Yeah, so maybe I can use it to monitor all the cool things that are going on in my house?

John:                Monitor it or you’re at the airport and you go, “God, did I turn that light off?”

Marcus:           Yeah.

John:                Quick log onto my website and look at the signals. There you go.

Marcus:           Interesting. So that might be something for developers that you might want to consider. So if you’re into the Internet of Things, which I’m not connected to the Internet of Things, then give this plugin a try.

John:                There you go. All right, the next one I’ve got here is called User Role Widget Areas. This is kind of a unique one that I’ve had different ways of doing this in the past to be able to have widgets that would display and hide, depending on the role of the user logged into the website. I’d forgotten which ones I had used and I couldn’t find them, so I just decided to do a search and see what’s new out there.

I discovered this one here and this one is kind of different in how they go about the process of putting your widgets into and setting them for user roles. It creates separate widget areas for separate user roles, and you dump your user roles into those widget areas and then you take the other widget that is for that specific user role and then you add that to your sidebar. So it’s kind of a two-step level here; while it seems complex, it’s rather easy to work with and it works rather well to be able to create multiple levels of users for different widgets to have the different widgets show up.

You might need widgets that would show up a login/logout bar. I’ve been working quite a bit lately on an intranet website and I needed to be able to show a logout box for people when they were logged into the intranet. But I needed that box to be completely disappeared if they access the website through the IP addresses that were free to get into the intranet, because otherwise, it asked them to log in when they didn’t need to. So this is one of the ways that I came about doing this to be able to hide that box. It worked quite wonderfully well.

So it’s a really great plugin, very simple to use, and just does exactly what it’s supposed to do, so of course we put this one right at the top as a 5-Dragon rating: User Role Widget Areas.

Marcus:           Hmm…got a lot of 5-star plugins there.

John:                This was a rockin’ day for me, man. I had a full house today.

Marcus:           Wow! Well, I’m going to leave you with something that maybe only Americans can appreciate, but I’m sure that everybody around the world is fascinated by this. We all love Hello Dolly, Matt Mullenweg’s famous plugin.

John:                Oh, yeah.

Marcus:           This one is Hello Trumpy!

John:                [Chuckling] All righty.

Marcus:           So what this does is it features quotes from now elected 45th President-elect of the United States of America, Donald Trump.

John:                Yes.

Marcus:           So whether in a good way or in a bad way, this actually gives some of Donald Trump’s most famous quotes right there in your admin bar. It’s just like Hello Dolly, except it’s Donald Trump. I thought it was pretty funny.

John:                It is funny. It is quite funny.

Marcus:           Regardless, and I will warn you, it’s probably not safe for kids, because Donald Trump does say some things that are —

John:                Yeah…yeah. His quotes are not always safe for kids.

Marcus:           [Laughter] Exactly.

John:                I’ve avoided bringing out the most famous one, just to keep our podcast clean.

Marcus:           Exactly. So if you want to have a little fun, whether you like Trump, whether you don’t like Trump, this is Hello Trumpy, and it gets a 4 out of 5 rating.

John:                There you go, check it out. All right, well that covers up our plugins for this show. I covered up Nav Menu Role, which I gave a 5 to; DCG Display Plugin Data from WordPress.org, which I gave a 5 to; and then User Role Widget Areas, which I gave a 5 to.

Marcus:           And I talked about Show Featured Image Size, which gets a 4, WP-MQTT gets a 4 – that’s the Internet of Things plugin, and Hello Trumpy gets a 4 out of 5, and Donald would call me a loser for giving him 4, but that’s okay.

 

[End of Audio]

 

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It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!

WordPress Plugins A-Z #281 Featured Image Size Notification, WordPress the Internet of Things

 

It's Episode 281 and we've got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It's all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!It’s Episode 281 and we’ve got plugins for Navigation menu Role Control, Donald Trump Quotes, User Roles, Featured Image Size Notification and a new protocol tool that connects WordPress to the Internet of Things. It’s all coming up on WordPress Plugins A-Z!Z!

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